Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: January 22, 2015
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 13

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Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    13F36C6F-1A90-43F7-B9F6-DC45E27E53C6 This journal entry was my favorite moment of the course. I had just begun experimenting with watercolors and it was warbler season, and I just had so much fun on this day playing with the colors and quick sketches of some warblers that were coming back into our area after a long, stressful winter and the beginning days of pandemic shutdowns. It was just such a joyful moment. I have tried doing some sitspot drawings and documenting the seasonal activities of birds at our feeder. I’m very excited to continue journaling and trying many of the suggested activities, especially incorporating some mapping into the entries and experimenting with different styles of journaling and embellishments. Thanks so much, Liz and Cornell for bringing this course into my home and giving me so much enjoyment and hope during long days of confinement. And thanks to all the students who shared their drawings and inspired me to keep going when I was struggling.    
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    Everything about Rachel Carson’s life and writings have inspired me, from my early years as a teen in the 1970’s to the present. There is still so much to learn from her. John James Audobon’s Birds of North America will forever be my favorite illustrated guide to birds. I love the exquisite details in his illustrations. I also have a collection of Clare Walker Leslie’s guides for journaling and sketching, and most recently Jean Mackay’s The Nature Explorer’s Sketchbook , For the Art of Your Discoveries. I’m inspired by their encouraging presentations of techniques for beginners like me. I haven’t begun writing reflections very much yet in my journaling, but this course has opened that window for me to explore. This course has given me so much to go forward with, to better appreciate the amazing natural world all around us, in every corner of the world. I’m having so much fun now, experimenting with sketching birds and creatures outside my window and on local hikes during this winter of pandemic confinement. Thank you, Liz, and Cornell for bringing this course into my home. 4C11800E-4B5A-4ABF-9798-90B1FDA4C6C0
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    • F04C5B6C-1906-4719-B097-26366A6F0201AAAA708B-DBAD-4073-AD25-EFC65CCF99E5 I feel better about the earlier sketch, honestly. I still need to work on shading and all of the watercolor techniques, but overall, I am very happy with the confidence I have gained through this course to jump in and begin, without worrying so much about a final outcome, and enjoy the process and the present moments within the process.
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    555E9441-7CB6-4B90-8D94-1365B472B520I had some fun experimenting with all three techniques, and tried some quick gesture-type sketches with the aquabrush and watercolors. I found that keeping the brush extra dry helped with the finer lines, deeper color tones and necklaces of the warblers; a wetter brush helped soften the gray tones..I definitely need more practice, but it was lots of fun..I think all of these techniques will be very helpful in my journaling projects. I definitely will use the dry brush for tree branches and trunks; the wet on wet for skies and water scenes and the wet on dry will be helpful for getting colors on the paper, to refine with added details
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    EFA9F7D9-BC9C-4C3A-ABA7-7343C6A3325AF1F8A6CA-366B-44C7-9AA0-0E2B77176A87D32EA2E3-1EC1-4E66-A4B5-74F254F7BA75 This was my first experience with watercolors since childhood, many decades ago..it was more difficult than I thought it would be, but it was an enjoyable process. I actually dove into some practice lessons before I attempted this exercise from some other resources in order to gain some confidence using the brush and playing with palettes. I chose a fern for my subject, and learned from another course that sometimes mixing many colors together can actually mimic colors in nature pretty well. I’m struggling with shading and getting my sketches to look polished, but I had fun playing with colors and I was pretty happy with the results for this exercise.
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    282C5C6F-CE89-46A2-BD09-FC08824422C4These are my 3rd and 4th attempts to refine the gesture drawing of the marsh wren. I found that quickly drawing the outline by contour drawing helped get the overall shape, then used some hatching and sketchy lines to fill in and add some depth. I struggled with getting the bill shape, proportions and eye to look right, but repeated practice helped a bit, and using  negative space helped with positioning the bird on the reed. I would say that quick sketching is coming more easily at this point. I need more practice with shading and adding depth and accuracy in details. I am so happy with the confidence this course is giving me to sketch everything.
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    43BD1FF1-8E23-4DFC-9B6E-604A28CDADC8Measuring proportion and using negative space were very helpful in making the drawing more accurate. Because it is still very wet and cold here, I drew from a photograph of a flower I had seen in a Maine forest. Measuring proportion seems to be very useful for drawing parts of plants and animals and for getting their positions more accurate in their settings. I’m still pretty inexperienced in sketching and drawing, so I’m not really sure yet where these techniques would be more or less helpful, but I’m excited to keep practicing and learning.FEB9EAA3-AE06-44BB-8E79-18BE7DCD2E97
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    F0F93072-222A-4C6D-A908-79549DE5BBBB579535B7-298D-488E-8FBB-F951504C0677I found that gesture drawing helped me to focus on the general outlines of the subjects and their movements. I found myself using the blind contour technique first, with some looking, to help quickly sketch the general outline of the bodies and motions and then used short sketchy strokes to fill in a bit of detail. I think the loose and quick aspects of this technique help me to just jump into the process without overthinking and focus on the overall shapes and activities.          
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    9C166559-4FE0-4F10-9074-ECA313CF28FDI do think contour drawing helped me stay completely focused on the subject, but I had no sense of where my hand was on the page or where the beginning of the drawing actually was. Because it is so cold outside, I sketched a birch tree. Again,  I was unsure of where the drawing had actually begun but the overall shape wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be.   597FBEF9-B640-4731-B1B9-013AE7DF36B8
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    I decided to draw from a couple of botanical prints since the weather outside is quite frightful, and thoughts of flowers give me hope through long winter evenings. The comparison study really helped me to focus on the details of the flower petals and stems, and then to wonder about how the differences worked to attract pollinators. Do the larger, flashier iris flowers attract larger pollinators than the delicate petals of myosotis? Why do  the smaller flowers grow in clumps of larger numbers of flowers than the more dramatic iris? The study definitely lead to lots of questions about form and function. I need to work on better organizing the written and drawn parts on the page.6CB09CD6-9D6D-46D4-A712-FB46278BC260
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    Sketching from a sit spot was so much fun! Prior to this course, I often wished I could sketch and draw my field observations, but lacked the confidence to try. Though I need a lot of practice, sketching really enhanced the experience for me; it was my “ outside of the box”.  Counting and tallying species comes easily, but interpreting behaviors is more difficult for me. FCD94D5D-0CE3-476B-8AE9-BEB2BDB6FE88    
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    1E1310AD-1690-403F-BEFF-F059764B18E9 1. I was nervous about drawing from the photo, but I was surprisingly happy with the result. The outline of the bird’s shape was easier than I thought it would be, and I found the feet to be the most challenging to draw. 2. Drawing the yellow warbler helped me to focus on the delicate bill shape and the patterns of its wings. I think having photos to refer to would be helpful in capturing details for nature journaling since birds are most often moving quickly in nature and often, for me, disappear before I can see or capture most of the details.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #646892
  • LeslieAnne
    Participant
    1) The works of Beatrix Potter, John James Audubon, Roger Tory Peterson, Rachel Carson, James Prosek, Clare Walker Leslie and so many others I have encountered over the course of my lifetime are my inspiration for beginning to sketch and journal from nature. I hope through this course to begin to put my own ideas and very limited skills to paper for the first time and I’m very excited and grateful for this opportunity to begin. I previously have not had a clue as to how to begin, especially since I have very limited drawing skills. 2) I really love the artistry in the monthly journal technique, and incorporation of some field notes and details to the subjects in journal entries. All of the journalists’ techniques are unique and inspiring! 3) I don’t have a different idea for journaling yet, but perhaps one will evolve as the course unfolds?    
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)