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Active Since: September 10, 2018
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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 40 total)
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 2 - The larger birds, like Cardinals and Blue Jays, do not get displaced as easy. A Junco, or Chickadee, gets easily scared, and displaced. By, the larger Birds, and the threat of predators. The smaller birds, seem to stay at the feeder for less time. By putting food in their cheeks, and then depositing them at a safe nest. The larger birds, Cardinals and Blue Jays, crack the nut and seeds, at the feeder. Also, they are not as super scared, of predators, or other birds. They are still flighty, and they fly away over sounds, or perceived threats. But not as much, or as in such a hurried frenzy, as Juncos, Sparrows, and smaller Finches. Larger billed birds, seem to have an easier time, with seeds and nuts. Taking more at once, and eating in place. Smaller birds, are scared of being out in the open. So they eat less in place, and take more back to home base. (nestled nest.)   Activity 3 -  I hear a lot of Blue Jays, and Cardinals. With the background of Chickadees and Nuthatches. I would say, the most common sounds are, the WHOOP TK WHOOP TK WHOOP, of the Northern Cardinal. And the JEER JEER, of the Blue Jay. The Blue Jay, has an ugly sound, for such a beautiful bird. Strange, that the best looking bird, sounds so off/weird. The Cardinals' sound is more, easy on the ear. Those two, make the loudest sounds. And the Chickadees, and Nuthatches, and Titmice, make softer, background noises. In more constant bunches. ????
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 1 - I went on a nature walk today, and saw a whole pond of Ducksblue duck 2, in a DABBLING PATTERN. Where every Duck, would dunk, and bob, in a pattern. For minutes on end. The same way a Robin, on the lawn, or a Shorebird, on the sand, would routinely forage. The Ducks, would go under, and come back up, for minutes on end. They seemed to dunk, and come back up, without really hunting. I know, that they are not Diving Ducks, they were Dabblers. So it seems they would dunk a few feet, and 'buoy,' back up. But without any real aim. Because the whole pond of ducks, were doing so, for the whole time I was there. What energy ! Do they get tired ? Does it work ? Fish or/and plant hunting ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    ACTIVITY 4 - There is a birding spot, in Beverly Ma.. that I have found to be reliable. It is by the McDonalds' and Starbucks, on rte. 62. I have routinely seen Snowy Egrets, and Cormorants, as well as Ducks and Seagulls. It is a very reliable spot, and convenient, to photograph birds. They (the birds) seem to like the inlet, connected to the ocean. As well as the fish, and foraging rewards, in the water. I have never, not seen birds there, in the summer months. Also, Egrets, and Herons, are tough to find. But this place, always seems to have a Snowy Egret, and a few ducks. I have a picture of a Snowy Egret, and a Duck, from the shore. On the sidewalk, near the rocky beach. It is a great location for Wading-HERON DUCKBirds/Waterfowl/Seabirds. From May, until Winter.            SAMPLE ABOVE.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 3 - The American Goldfinch, has a more colorful summer plumage, when compared to its' winter plumage. There is a crest type marking, on the crown, of the bird. It is an arrow shaped black mark. It also gives the illusion of a crest, but I do not think it sticks out at all. Not like a Titmouse. The belly, rump, and back of the bird, in the summer, has distinct yellow. But in the winter, it has dull yellow, light brown, markings. Also, in the winter, the black arrow shape, recedes.  The winter plumage retains a little pure yellow, under the beak. But not nearly as much as in the summer. I have a photo of an A.G. in the summer of 2020. Massachusetts.   A Common Loon, in the Summer, has checkered diamond patterns, on its' edge of the rump. And on its' shoulder. And on its' wings. Star type speckles, and A dark black head, and darker fine feathers, on its' head. Also, a 'necktie,' mark in its' neck. The Winter Common Loon, is plainer, with a white neck and belly color, and no 'ladder,' markings. Nor patterns. The dark black areas, seem to exchange1st can. color, into a dark grey. And there is no distinct, 'necktie.' Just a void in that area. Not as finely outlined.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 2 - I would guess, the 3 birds that are permanent residents of the N.East, or at least migrate when, and if they want to. And short distances. Would be the Blue Jay, Northern Cardinal, and a Swan. I have seen each of these three, in winter months. And they may migrate, at their whim, shorter distances. Also a Chickadee, or a Junco. I have seen in snowy settings, and in winter months. I wonder, If they travel, a few states south, in a horrid winter. Or if they can stay,in the N.East, even in a deep freeze.   A Red-Winged Blackbird, a Canada Goose, and an Ibis/Heron, or Crane order bird. I would guess, are migratory. I have read that RWB's, migrate at night, as the cold season hits. I have also seen so many Canada Geese fly south, in their arrow formation. That, we can all assume,3131-13bjay L means that they migrate. And are partial seasonal residents, depending on the region/area. I would assume, that any Ibis/Crane order bird, would migrate to a Southern climate. I do not think a GBH, does better in the cold, than near, or past the south, the MASON DIXON LINE, area. However, some are called, 'SNOWY-EGRETS.' Is that because they can handle the snow, or is it an artistic name, for their white color. I have seen, in the Cornell maps, that Raptors and Terns, migrate through the N.EAST, and past the N.EAST. from North of the USA, and they go down to the south. I think they are decision migrants. Because, they are seen in all areas, in all seasons ? Are there Ospreys in CANADA and GEORGIA, in January, at the same time ? I dunno ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    ACTIVITY 1 - the Northern Cardinal is ranged more, East of the Mississippi. Filling the coast of the USA, north and south. I have heard that the 'pyrrhuloxia,' a relative of the Cardinal, is West of the Mississippi. The Blackburnian Warbler is ranged, in its' general, yearly abundance, further north, and further south. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Scarlet Tanager, has Northern population, and southern population. As related to the USA and Central America, and Northern-South America. The Western Tanager, is west of the Mississippi, as noted in its' name. And is a different form of Tanager. 31-13The Scarlet T., is red with black wings. The Western T., has yellowish colors, and more markings. Not as solid in coloring. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Ruby Throated Hummingbird is an East of the Mississippi-bird, in general population. The Rufous Hummingbird is west and south of the Mississippi. I would assume less population in northern areas, due to the need of flowers to feed from.  Are Hummingbirds migrating more south than other birds ? Sooner ? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The SandHill Crane, has a scattered population, in its' year round sum of population. The Yellow Bellied FlyCatcher is scattered NE/and South-USA. With some gaps in the USA SE. PICTURE IS A 'MALE NORTHERN CARDINAL.' NE/USA/MASSACHUSETTS
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    DSCF0529   An,  of the 'Crane Order,' Bird. On the north-shore of MA. He probably will go South for the Winter. As far as where ? Northern Georgia ? Is a Snowy Egret a 'must migrate' bird ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 1 - I have watched the 'Hairy Woodpecker.' Whom was pecking on some surfaces that were not trees. He was pecking at a seeded lawn, and a hole in my garage. He was bigger than a 'Downy Woodpecker,' and it took me a little guesswork to separate him from an 'Acorn Woodpecker.' I did not know the 'Hairy Woodpecker,' was so big. It must have been a big one. He seem to beak-drum, no matter the surface. And he pecks and drums at everything. Lots of head and beak movements. Also goes from tree, to any surface, with the potential for successful pecking and foraging. Bigger and stronger than I thought.   Activity 2 - I would say, the most likely birds to see this time of year, are the Blue Jays and Cardinals. Because in OCTOBER, in New England, they do not have to migrate. The Canada Goose, you see them flying south, but you still see some of them, for now. I have not seen as many Red Winged Blackbirds, yet I never see them migrate. Do they just disappear ? I just looked it up, they migrate at night. Strange how they are so numerous in natural settings, but unseen as they migrate, and are not seen in industrial settings. Weird. I guess, up until late fall, in the N.E., Cardinals and Blue Jays are still around, and the Canada Goose are leaving in arrow formations. But some are still  at grassy patches for now.   Activity 3 - I learned about some birds, that I did not know before. I know Ospreys pass by here, because they like the N.E., and it is part of their path. I did not know the Red Winged Black Bird was such a popular bird. They are everywhere in a nature setting, but seem to avoid rural settings. There seem to be a lot of WaterBirds that are in watery areas, that must go south of the N.E., and start north of the N.E. Because the Herons and Egrets must go to warmer watery locales, when they need to, in the winter. How far south ? By decision or yearly ? I did not know the Arctic Tern travels so far. They pass by the N.E., I would assume, on their way to the Southern areas. S.America, or the wind channel to Europe/Africa. I still am not sure how, and where, non-migrating birds, stay in the dead of winter. I know my bird photography hobby will take a hit in the winter. Unless, I find out where to find, the non-'must' migrating birds. Snowy owl ? Raptors ? Where are you ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    Activity 1 - A White Breasted Nuthatch is a bird with a distinct shape. It has a torso that is parallel to the tree surface, when it is climbing down a tree. And its' beak and head face straight up, in correlation to its' torso. A Northern Cardinal has a 'permacrest,' I would call it. Unlike a titmouse, its' 'permacrest,' is solid, and does not change in relation to its' animal instincts. I guess ? Unlike a Titmouse, or the Hooded Merganser. You would never confuse them, but the Cardinal seems, to me, to have a crest/point, that does not change. Activity 2 - 3 Birds with similar, yer different color schemes, are the : ROBIN, the TOWHEE, and the EASTERN BLUEBIRD. They have a color that envelops the upper body, and another color that encompasses the breast. The Towhee has a darker black on the back area, the Robin has a greyer back. And the Bluebird has a reddish/orange breast, and a blue upper back/body. Activity 3 - Junco, Sparrow, and Finches. Seem, to me, to ground forage together, and in similar fashion. I would also say, I may have seen a chickadee join in, but also, chickadees' do their own thing too. Not sure, but in my yard, the chickadee's join the ground foraging, and do more tree foraging too.? Some Finch types do their own thing, and some seem to join the Junco, Sparrow combination. Activity 4 - A Cormorant . I have seen them on the rocks of the water. They have a dark body, and an orange beak. They seem to be the best multi-talented bird. Diving, and swimming, and flying. And size and strength. They have the same attributes as diving waterfowl, but more strength and general animal talent. I saw one last week, and it was not just some duck. I thought it was as diverse as a diving waterfowl, but had the power of an eagle/pelican. Great display on the rocks of the reservoir. Display, drying body, sunbathing, combination.????? Cormorants' all seem to do this. I have seen 2 types. A Great Cormorant, and a ?flightess? one. It had smallish wings. Not sure. One was at a reservoir, One at the ocean beach.  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    DSCF0428DSCF0324 These are some of the birds in the neighborhoods, I have walked in. The Canada Goose, with one foot, was hopping and surviving. Foraging. Poor Thing.   And the SeaGulls are at the beach, drinking the water, and 'in a mingle.' I never knew they drank water like that, it looks interesting.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    THE PELICAN and THE WOOD DUCK, are my favorites.   THE PELICAN, because it has a mixture of strength and playfulness, in its' looks and style.   THE WOOD DUCK, because it is unique and cool looking. It has a 'one of a kind,' profile and assortment of colors.  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    ducks n' pipersHERON DUCK The three types of birds, are : Duck/Waterfowl. White Heron/Waterbird-Wading Bird. And the Shorebirds/Pipers. The pictures were taken today, 8/6/20. I have noticed some birds are very flighty, and some are not. The Heron flew away after the pictures, but the ducks did not. -b.k. All these birds connected to the water, but differently.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    IMG_20200408_213951~11 Combining creativity. Abstract/with Realism. I will fine tune this drawing some more. Watercolors are tough to perfect each line. I may used mixed medium again, with a fine Sharpie, to finish, b.k.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    20200404_212641-2-1-1
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    My favorite nature metaphor is from a song called, "All I can do is write about it." The line is, ....."have you ever seen a she-gator protect her youngin', or fish in a river, swimming so free......have you ever seen the beauty of the hills of Carolina, or the sweetness of the grass in Tennessee." By Lynyrd Skynyrd. Some of the other nature metaphors I enjoy are, a song by John Lee Hooker, Blue Bird. Where he sings about the travels of a bluebird, in his opening lines. I reformatted a Skynyrd poem, into my own verse. ........."Have you ever seen an Orange Spider, spinning her webs, so skillfully. Have you ever seen a Hummingbird fly, so free and so free. Now see Spider and Bird dance and fly together, so gloriously." I like the fact that birds are the universal animal for states and stamps. Why ? Do all countries have a national bird ? Do all states, countries, and post offices use a bird for a stamp ? My favorite bird is an IBIS, because it has multiple sides/traits. Sort of comical, bold, fat, skinny, short, long, etc... Not pure boldness, (EAGLE) or humor. (TURKEY) A Funny Bird. A 'combo.'  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13

    @Student Birder Thanks, I usually use pencils, and am starting to get into water colors. The colors pop more, and leave more 3-d. -bk

  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    IMG_20200329_183933~6 A Vulture/Condor. Reference photo and interpretation. Some mixed medium, to finish the outlines at the end of the sketch. Fine Markers, almost all W.Colors.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    IMG_20200314_165042~2Mixed Medium. Almost all Watercolors, some pen, pencil foundation, and metallics. R-Y-B-G-BL
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    IMG_20200313_215006~2I did a medium-thick line, interpretation. I put in the sun, to practice lights.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    suzukiawd13
    oceanfowl 2.0 for d.w.IMG_20200223_175531~3
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 40 total)