Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: March 4, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 12

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    I plan to use a rubric to evaluate the student projects.  I will make an excel sheet that shows how the points will be distributed for each section of the report and allow students to use the rubric as a checklist.  Students will have a peer review period before handing in their projects and there will be additional time to make revisions based on peer feedback.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    In my class, students prepare typed scientific reports based on a set rubric.  In my experience students are unfamiliar with getting out of the cookie cutter labs that are the most efficient (but not very effective) ways for teachers to complete experiments with limited time.  The rubric for scientific reports establishes where the points are coming from in general and provide students a checklist to make sure they are fulfilling all of the requirements.  Individual experiments then have rubrics attached to their lab worksheets which in most cases takes the place of instructions.  The general scientific report rubric allows my students to practice the way they share their findings in a manner that can be repeated and understood by others and the individual experiment rubric allows them to tailor their report to the specific experiment.  I like the idea of having my students do peer reviews on their reports and plan to implement that next year.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    The Citizen-Science Project I chose was Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration (SCOPE).  In this project individuals help Scientist classify hundreds of thousands of stars never before classified.  Unpon signing up, individuals will compare the light stemming from pictures taken from the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI).  These images are then compared to spectra charts which allow individuals to classify these stars. The database of stars is available for free to the public, but individuals need to sign up to gain access to the data.  In my class, we identify light spectrum to drawn conclusions about the atomic matter that is generating the light.  In my classroom we do this using gas filled bulbs.  As a follow up to that effort, students could identify unclassified stars using the same spectral analysis.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    The strategy I use to get students to go deeper into observation and get beyond surface level questions is time and probing questions.  Most student observation are at first reference questions, but by acknowledging those questions as a valid and a good starting point, it give students a safe environment to probe a little deeper into their statements.  I ask students follow up questions to their reference statements and give them time to go deeper into their observations.  I believe working with their initial questions gives them confidence that they are on the right track so they feel comfortable following their own curiosity.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    I participated in the GLOBE project.  I was drawn to the globe project because of the connections to the NASA satellites which are a part of my curriculum.  Signing up for the GLOBE project included downloading an app and there were 4 different types of Citizen Science projects to participate in.  I chose the NASA GLOBE Cloud Observation Project.  To do my observations I needed to observe the ground, precipitation, and cloud cover.  The main issue I ran into, and students may run into, was that the identification of clouds, their height, and forms was difficult.  There was a cloud ID wizard that helped, but I am concerned that my inability to perfectly ID the types of cloud I am looking at would lead to poor data.  I took additional time to make sure that I identified them correctly, but I am not sure every student would take as much time to do it correctly.  If I were to use this in my classroom, I would try to make cloud types a learning outcome for my class
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    The best way I have found to encourage students to observe and wonder is to make sure that they are in an environment where they can be exposed to interesting phenomenon.  Even if I have an agenda based on what my learning targets are, I can start the process by providing this phenomenon.  Once engaged, allowing my students to ask questions and focusing on those questions to lead our discussion.  Posing open ended questions as follow ups to those student observations is a great practice I want to improve upon in my own instruction.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    The most impactful thing was the ability to slow down and notice the things that usually are not noticed by me.  I started hearing more subtle sounds like the skittering of squirrels and the distant bark of a dog.  The time I took to make the observations was important because the longer I waited, the more became apparent to me.  For my students, I want to encourage them to take their time in observing their environment so they allow the more subtle things occur to become noticed.sound map
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    I would like to include a wonder board in the beginning of my investigations.  Reading many of these inquiry practices has made me realize that many of my labs have been too guided to start and that students could provide that initial push themselves making the process more inquiry based.  In general I would like to move my inquiry activities to more of an open structure.  I also would like to incorporate a citizen science project in my class and use the 3 practices from UC Davis when implementing the citizen science.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    All three teaching practices I would like to model in my practices.  The classroom environment is vital to me for any successful learning so positioning my students as youth who can do science is important.  Making them feel like they are real contributes to a larger scientific community will make their contributions more meaningful.  I especially like the questions "Could a scientist use this information?"  The second practice (frame the work locally and globally) is also important to me, especially on the local level.  Students will be much more invested and intrinsically motivated if they believe that their work will make a difference in their own lives and community.  The third practice (attending to the unexpected) is a perfect way to allow inquiry to come through in the class by allowing student discoveries and questions drive what they are learning.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    I have not yet done citizen science in my classroom.  In looking at the examples in the text, it is obvious the benefits citizen science can have in my classroom.  The S'COOL is one citizen science project I can incorporate into my physics classes.  We spend a great deal of time explaining how satellites work and communicate.  We also discuss the many difficulties satellites have communicating with proper timing in my classes.  Connecting the information flow of satellites with data observed on earth is a great way of involving my students in working with NASA to fine tune their satellites that ties into my curriculum.  With my classes out for the time being due to COVID-19, this is something I may incorporate into this years activities if classes remain remote as appears likely.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    One interesting lesson I do on batteries involves students investigating how to make a battery from fruit and vegetables.  A battery uses zinc galvanized nail and copper strips to power a light or clock.  In this activity I demonstrate how putting the nail and copper strip into a lemon can cause a LED light to glow.  I then allow students to work in small groups and experiment with different fruits and vegetables to determine which would could be used as a battery.  I provide students with a graphic organizer to record their thought and observations.  After the activity groups share our their thoughts and conclusions.  I would rate this lesson between a 2 and 3 on the inquiry spectrum.  I could increase the level of inquiry here by allowing students to pose their own questions and experiment with the fruit instead of a demonstration.  I could also allow the students come up for themselves what they would like to investigate instead of asking them to determine which items make the best batteries.
  • Adam
    Participant
    sweeney718
    Inquiry Map
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)