Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: September 7, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 17

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Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    62C41D79-AF9D-44AC-8E07-3CF2BBB1D377
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    This exercise was very valuable for me - so many helpful tips and reminders. Need to practice, practice, practice . . . I was really glad to hear Liz say, “And sometimes when I’m out in the field I pick my favorite drawing to refine, and I add more detail later.”  I often sketch birds, who are almost always moving at least a little. Somehow I had the impression that Nature Journaling meant that every drawing had to be completed in the field, and that it was sort of ‘cheating’ to refine them later! Below are a page from this course exercise and a sketchbook page from last fall. 1C1FBE53-A6E9-45A9-BE6F-28655D7F56BB7BFC110F-174D-4E45-A966-E26AA15FB822
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I remember doing blind contour drawing in a class I took many years ago. I agree with others that it’s so challenging NOT to look! Maybe if I gave myself more space on a single page for each, these might not have been so ‘off’! Interesting and fun observation exercise. 6E31939B-942E-4D60-9B28-8A2336A30743
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I found my first comparison study very difficult ... choosing to sketch two orchids was way too ambitious. It was challenging to get proportions right, to indicate texture and shading, and it was especially hard to capture the tiny details, but it was a great exercise in observing closely! I’m hoping the future lessons will help me improve my drawing skills.  As for a balance on my journal pages, I’ve followed Jack Laws’ videos for several months, and I have his book on Nature Journaling, so I had started developing a style, but got away from it when I started the course. I think it’s time to return to some of that now, in terms of how I lay out each page, and what I include. I love this course and am learning so much! Thank you, Liz!52F203EB-C40F-45B4-B014-A284134564D0
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    6FEC593E-E074-420B-8B19-7ED3C96D79DCA20252BE-414F-4576-8E69-A2C5DE8739F6 Noticing - Form & Function.  On a recent walk at our local wildlife refuge, I noticed two large patches with multiple 1” holes in the sand, as seen in the photos above. It was startling to see all these holes along the paths, and me wonder who made them and whether both patches were made by the same creature. The refuge has lots of fire ants and also lots of Lubber grasshoppers (who hatch from the ground in early spring) at this time of year, so I guessed that these holes were homes to one of them. But when I looked up ‘ant holes’, I made a fascinating discovery - these crater-like pits appear to be the engineering feat of Antlion larvae, known to be voracious little predators.  I remembered learning years ago about how Antlion larvae hide in wait and feed on ants and other insects that fall into their traps. What an ingenious design! I also discovered that these insects are sometimes called Doodlebugs, because of the winding, spiraling trails they make in the sand when they emerge from their pits!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I enjoyed your use of watercolor and I loved your comments and questions!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I agree with Andrew - I like the way you wove the text into the drawing and your sketches make me think of all the same birds we see in our nearby marshes.
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Sat on my front bench at 12 noon when it was 90 degrees and then next to the pond behind my house at about 5 pm, just as a light rain began to fall. It was interesting how quiet both experiences were, and how almost free of birds, as we always enjoy birds year round both in front and back. Probably too hot for birds at Sit #1 and too drizzly for birds at Sit #2 ☺️ I had a lovely sense of quiet delight when returning indoors - very much enjoyed taking time to notice many little details in new ways. Intentionally wrote notes rather than sketching, but I love seeing everyone’s sketches here ... inspires me to do much more of this and just DRAW.D35E34FA-7B24-4BD2-837A-8A01E49CA2466CC7E27C-DE0C-492F-813E-D6EEDC2CBD09  
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    B9391F98-E70E-41CD-860C-9A362CA0881E1FB02042-5CB9-4107-B0A7-B4DFF225C993AA436786-49C5-4A62-9B0A-4D7C104149DDI I really enjoy watching the instructional videos - thank you, Liz! And the exercises are great, so helpful.  Getting the texture and the lighting and shadow are ALL so challenging, but I realize it takes LOTS of practice.  Very inspiring to read and see everyone’s posts!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    These are wonderful images, and I love how you labeled each one with the type of technique so we can see the differences - thanks!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Same reaction! Awesome pear!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Love these and feel like I could just slice right into them and see the juice come out! I am amazed at the way you used color - makes them look so real. I started looking at the discussion posts before learning the content here, but it’s hard to imagine myself ever getting to this level!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Thanks for sharing this progression, Gigi. They all look great to me, but now I can really see the difference from first to last!
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Couldn’t upload this with my post below - not sure why?
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #680934
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I enjoyed drawing from the Warbler photo, though it was challenging. It’s so much easier to draw from a photo than drawing birds from real life, though, because the bird doesn’t move! I photograph birds all the time, but rarely keep up with my nature journaling, because it’s so much easier and quicker to use my camera. When drawing from a photo like this, I can spend a lot of time looking back and forth, checking details and proportions, erasing, and editing over and over, noticing so much more. I’d really like to become more intentional and committed to journaling in the field. I spend a lot of time outdoors in natural areas, mostly near marshes, ponds, and wetlands of all kinds, and worry that I’ll miss a good photo opportunity if I get “sidetracked” with my nature journal! But when I do take the time - and my sketchbook - I learn so much and SEE so much. I’m hoping this course will help me be more consistent about journaling.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #680889
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    Tried to attach this
  • Carol
    Participant
    carolrasowsky
    I first saw this course last fall, and experimented for a few weeks with nature journaling on my own. But with so much free time during this strange “new reality”, I gave myself the gift of registering for the class – and am so glad that I did! What an inspiration! What a treasure you have created with this course... So much information and so many valuable ideas. Thank you for including the discussion board, and for allowing all of these resources to be available at any time.  I’ve been blogging about birds and nature for 6 years, and am hoping the structure of this course will help me transition to more journaling as well. My goal is to gain the motivation to make nature journaling a consistent habit. Tried to attach one of my early nature journal pages from last fall, but it didn’t work :)
Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)