Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: February 16, 2017
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 7

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Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Linda
    Participant
    Doing a comparison study was a great learning experience.  I did a study between a flight feather and a down feather - which with further study I realized was actually a semi-plume feather.  The flight feather is a wing rather than a tail feather, I think.  It has bands of faded light and dark browns.  So, since it is faded, I believe it is an old, molted feather.  It is 9 1/2 "  and looks to be the feather of a red-tailed hawk.  The semi-plume feather is quite beautiful with a striking spotted pattern.  I plan to redraw it once my drawing skills improve! Also, I need to figure out how to identify this feather.  The spots are probably a good clue.DSCN1092
  • Linda
    Participant
    The sketch below shows the trials of nesting season.  A pair of redwing blackbirds have a nest in the lake grass along the shoreline.  I constantly see one of the blackbirds, male I'm assuming, chasing a crow away.  The crow keeps coming back and the blackbird has to expend so much energy chasing the crow! Then one morning, there was a turkey vulture there.  I wondered if the eggs or hatchlings were destroyed.  But the little blackbird chased away this huge vulture.  The vulture did not come back but the crow is around.  Daily, for over a week, the blackbird chases the crow.  I wonder if any survived in the nest, and if not, whether another clutch of eggs was laid.  There is still something there to protect.
  • Linda
    Participant
    DSCN1091
  • Linda
    Participant
    Below is my submission.  A bit messy for a first try but it was a very enjoyable experience.  It took 3 tries - the first two times were too noisy with human activities - leaf blowers, chain saws, etc.  Grrr...  When I first sat down the third time on the dock at the lake (across the street from my home), there only seemed a tiny bit of activity.  But soon enough, I saw there was lots going on.  From tiny winged bugs of some sort, to a large vulture flying overhead.  And I was very surprised to see a huge snake curled up in the lake grass quite near me.  Didn't even notice it at first.  I think it's a rat snake.  I look forward to being better at identifying what I am seeing.  Most of the birds I did know.  We're lucky in this part of Michigan to have sandhill cranes.  They were calling out while I was sitting there.  A very fun time!
  • Linda
    Participant
    DSCN1088
  • Linda
    Participant
    yellow warblerThe picture actually looks better on paper than in the photo.  But I hope to get better with detail and proportion.  The good thing is, that by doing this sketch, I'll be looking at more detail the next time I spot a yellow warbler.  This actually came out better than I expected!
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #662615
  • Linda
    Participant
    I want to slow down and be more observant of my surroundings outdoors and nature journaling will be the perfect way to do that.  I also need to be better at identifying plants and birds which this will also help me with.  Several years ago I was pretty good at sketching but have lost my touch and need to start over.  Looking at the journalers here, I hope to become as great as they are!  I like the tip to think of the fundamental shapes in nature such as circles and ovals which is an easier way to start sketching.  I also liked the patches of color that the journaler used on the pages to show all the colors in the place that was being observed.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)